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News

Wrapping-up the Preseason Motorcycle Kick-off … Stay committed to riding safe!

  • Published
  • By Lisa Gonzales
  • Air Force Safety Center

As the Preseason Motorcycle Kick-off comes to a close, remember to stay committed to riding with the right mentality, the right gear and inspect your bikes for every ride. In the preseason video released on February 17, the Department of the Air Force Chief of Safety, and Commander, Air Force Safety Center, Major General Jeannie Leavitt urged every rider to stay committed to riding safely every ride and to protect themselves while they ride.

Over the past 10 years, the DAF has lost 127 Airmen and Guardians to motorcycle accidents, where the cause was known, to include speeding, reckless behaviors, lack of or no personal protective gear, and alcohol.

Did they assess the risks before they decided to ride? Did peer pressure make them act so recklessly? What would you tell them? As part of the commitment riders are asked to continue sending in your “Why I Ride” near miss stories to help other riders in assessing the risks involved in riding a motorcycle.

“I want every DAFRider to make riding a motorcycle personal, not only for yourselves but your families and friends,” said David Brandt, motorcycle safety program manager for the Department of the Air Force. “When you make it personal for those you love, the easier it is to commit to training, wearing the right gear and staying mentally focused.”

Most motorcycle riders will tell you that riding a motorcycle is the feeling of freedom; freedom from the worries of the world, but they will also tell you that riding comes with risks. Some of those risks are weather, other drivers not seeing them, and potholes in the road are just a few.

Every rider should make a commitment to their families, friends, and coworkers to do whatever it takes to arrive back alive. Additionally, every rider has the responsibility to get equipped with the skills needed for every bike, to practice low-speed work before every ride, to be geared up every time you ride, and to be mentally prepared.